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Quality instruction of teacher in classroom

Behavioural Management

There are real concerns which we share about some young people’s behaviour because it may on occasion damage them, their relationships, their education and chances of a satisfying future or, in the worst examples, it may demonstrate the damage which has been done to them here are real concerns which we share about some young people’s behaviour because it may on occasion damage them, their relationships, their education and chances of a satisfying future or, in the worst examples, it may demonstrate the damage which has been done to them There are real concerns which we share about some young people’s behaviour because it may on occasion damage them, their relationships, their education and chances of a satisfying future or, in the worst examples, it may demonstrate the damage which has been done to them

There are real concerns which we share about some young people’s behaviour because it may on occasion damage them, their relationships, their education and chances of a satisfying future or, in the worst examples, it may demonstrate the damage which has been done to them.

So how can we keep all the concerns in an effective balance? By continuing to keep things in context, and by illuminating the behaviour which concerns us, and our response to it. This section looks at the context by concentrating on three aspects: •understanding ‘the big picture’ on school behaviour; •understanding the classroom; •looking at ways of explaining difficult behaviour.

SCHOOLS MAKE A DIFFERENCE

The behaviour which pupils display in school is not always a simple reflection of their behaviour elsewhere, including at home. When teachers and parents report on the same children at home and at school, there is comparatively little overlap in the difficulties identified. Further, most teachers know model pupils who they have later found to live under very adverse home circumstances.

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Explaining difficult behaviour

Whenever we describe or explain behaviour, the way we do it can display certain trends and effects. For example, we explain other people’s behaviour in terms of them as people, but we explain our own behaviour in terms of the situation(s) we’re in. When we describe to ourselves or to others, or explain difficult behaviour displayed by another person, there is a range of language that we might use. Given below are five general ‘explanations’, each with a few particular examples

Explaining difficult behaviour

Whenever we describe or explain behaviour, the way we do it can display certain trends and effects. For example, we explain other people’s behaviour in terms of them as people, but we explain our own behaviour in terms of the situation(s) we’re in. When we describe to ourselves or to others, or explain difficult behaviour displayed by another person, there is a range of language that we might use. Given below are five general ‘explanations’, each with a few particular examples Why reactive approaches are not effective Reactive approaches tend not to be effective. By ‘reactive’ we mean any approach that focuses on action after an incident. For example, those staff-room conversations of the form ‘What do you do if they do X?’ Another example is ‘If they do X we’ll do Y’. In each case, the person adopting this approach is being led by the person doing ‘X’ – in this way they’re not exercising optimum control.

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